Many people blame sin on our adamic nature. And, they make some good points. Unless we are living in denial, or under tremendous condemnation, how else can we explain why a born-again person would do, think, and feel bad things?

By definition, to be born-again is to be a new creature in Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17). But, believer’s experiences of temptation are proof that has not yet fully taken affect. The following quote from the Words of Life website sums up the internal conflict experienced by so many believers. “All who have been born again possess the sinful nature, which they inherited from Adam, and the divine nature, which they received when they were born again.” In other words, the article says, every believer has two natures, often at war with each other. This may not help solve the temptation problem, but it may help relieve some guilt.

But, what if there is another explanation for that internal conflict? What if God understands our sufferings differently? Could it be possible that He wants us to have His understanding but we are so set on our understanding that we refuse His before we even know what it is? Could it be possible that God looks at our trials and how to overcome them in a way totally different from the way we think?

The Apostle Paul said, “knowing this, that our old self was crucified with Him, in order that our body of sin might be done away with, so that we would no longer be slaves to sin.” (Roman 6:6, New American Standard Bible)

What many call “the adamic” nature is what Paul called our old self. The New Testament has many references to the complete and absolute death of all of mankind with Christ as well as our resurrection into His new life, who Paul says is our life. Yet, our experiences often tell us that is not possible, except in a theoretical or spiritual sense. So, what should we do?

The fact is, God does not play games with words. He has no falsehood or deceit; He cannot lie (Titus 1:2). Thus, there must be another reason for the conflict which seems like two natures warring within us.

If you are hungry to know the answer to this and many other questions, stay with us on this website, or read UNSEEN: Believing the Truth, understanding the Lie.

Many people blame sin on our adamic nature. And, they make some good points. Unless we are living in denial, or under tremendous condemnation, how else can we explain why a born-again person would do, think, and feel bad things?

By definition, to be born-again is to be a new creature in Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17). But, believer’s experiences of temptation are proof that has not yet fully taken affect. The following quote from the Words of Life website sums up the internal conflict experienced by so many believers. “All who have been born again possess the sinful nature, which they inherited from Adam, and the divine nature, which they received when they were born again.” In other words, the article says, every believer has two natures, often at war with each other. This may not help solve the temptation problem, but it may help relieve some guilt.

But, what if there is another explanation for that internal conflict? What if God understands our sufferings differently? Could it be possible that He wants us to have His understanding but we are so set on our understanding that we refuse His before we even know what it is? Could it be possible that God looks at our trials and how to overcome them in a way totally different from the way we think?

The Apostle Paul said, “knowing this, that our old self was crucified with Him, in order that our body of sin might be done away with, so that we would no longer be slaves to sin.” (Roman 6:6, New American Standard Bible)

What many call “the adamic” nature is what Paul called our old self. The New Testament has many references to the complete and absolute death of all of mankind with Christ as well as our resurrection into His new life, who Paul says is our life. Yet, our experiences often tell us that is not possible, except in a theoretical or spiritual sense. So, what should we do?

The fact is, God does not play games with words. He has no falsehood or deceit; He cannot lie (Titus 1:2). Thus, there must be another reason for the conflict which seems like two natures warring within us.

If you are hungry to know the answer to this and many other questions, stay with us on this website, or read UNSEEN: Believing the Truth, understanding the Lie.

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